The Making of an Art Quilt 2

June Blooms art quilt, approx. 16 x 16″, Karen Gillis Taylor 2012

All fabric pieces are cut and are tacked down temporarily, ready for machine stitching of edges.

On July 2 I posted the beginning progress of my art quilt called “June Blooms.” Color choices and design were based on one of my abstract floral paintings done earlier this year. Drawings and templates were made, and fabrics chosen drawn from the painting’s inspiration. (Please go back and look at the July 2, 2012 post for that.)

All pieces in place, I machine-stitched all the edges with a zigzag stitch. That served to quilt the 3 layers together, (batting and backing below) and then more quilting with a straight stitch was added in the background shapes and spaces. Finally, I added a very narrow binding to finish the edges. (That was a challenge!)

Non-quilting people have been asking me, what are you going to do with this piece? (They are used to my painting work, and some aren’t sure what an art quilt even IS.) Small art quilts, like small paintings are meant for more intimate spaces, best viewed close up. This piece makes a good “cubicle quilt”, to glance at when you are in your office or studio next to the computer. At home, small art works fit on skinny walls between door jams, or in entry ways.

Art quilts are soft and friendly, yet can be very bold and stimulating to the senses of beauty and warmth, which our office spaces really need. I once saw a show where a designer was creating a lovely cubicle work space for her client with many plants and even a water feature. I think this little quilt would fit well in that kind of space.

(That reminds me, I need to go get a water feature for my office cube!)

June Blooms in the back yard, except it’s now July when finally finished!

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One Response to “The Making of an Art Quilt 2”

  1. Leslie Ann Clark Says:

    wow, this really turned out great! You know me, I always love contrast! Love the weight of the dark colors on the bottom, they set the whole piece and allow the lights to spring forward! Wonderful!

    Like

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